Wednesday, January 29, 2014

{Audio}Book Review: The Invention of Wings

Here's what it's all about (per audible)

Hetty "Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

Kidd’s sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership of ten year old Handful, who is to be her handmaid.We follow their remarkable journeys over the next thirty-five years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other’s destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love.
As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women’s rights movements.

Tease:
Click HERE to see a tease from the book.
 
Story:
 
I was pulled in right away. As soon as I hit "play" I was in the South right there watching Sarah and Handful live their lives. Sue Monk Kidd's writing is so vivid and descriptive. I felt I could see the house Sarah grew up in, the streets of Philadelphia, the Spirit Tree, where Handful and Charlotte did their sewing and so much more!

The story is broken in to parts - periods of time. It makes the story really move along effortlessly and it has a nice flow. Every other chapter alternates between the POV of Sarah and Handful (I LOVE that in any book).  Both characters have distinctively different lives and distinctly different voices and each chapter really allows you to see that.

Performance: 
 
I really liked the narration By Jenna Lamia, Adepero Oduye.  The stammers, the singing, the awkwardness, the sadness, all the moments truly made this story come to life for me.  I liked the two voices for this one audiobook and I think I'll look for more books that offer this type of performance.

Overall Thoughts:
 
I was hestitant to read this at first. I liked the other Sue Monk Kidd book The Secret Life of Bees but I didn't love it (I thought it was just aiiiight). This book on the other hand I really liked. I recommend this to you.  I have to admit I even liked the Author's note which I know I wouldn't have read if I had this book in paperback or kindle format, but being that it was an audiobook I listened. And what I heard (and enjoyed) was Sue Monk Kidd going over all the details of the book and letting the reader know what was fact and what she created. She took historical figures and brought them to life again in this book and in a way she saw them. LOVED that. And I love now knowing what is true and what she made up.
 
 
 


I listened to this book on my iphone. Love the convenience of that.

1 comment:

  1. Just saw this book yesterday at the store and almost picked it up. Couldn't really get into Life of Bees--need to give it another try. Thanks for the review on this one--adding it to my "to reads."

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